Intravenous iron

Cardiorenal Forum Masterclass 2
Monday 7th December 2020
18.00 – 19.45 GMT

Intravenous iron in cardiorenal disease


Pharmacosmos has provided an educational grant to the Cardiorenal Forum (Secretariat, Concise Clinical Consulting) to support the costs of running this webinar and has had no influence over the content or selection of speakers for the programme


What is the webinar about?

This is the second in our Masterclass series looking at the clinical use of intravenous (iv) iron. The focus of this Masterclass is on its use in the patient with cardiorenal disease, particularly chronic kidney disease (CKD). Iron deficiency anaemia is a common complication of CKD and is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The mortality may be related to the severity of anaemia.

So it is important that we accurately diagnose iron deficiency in our cardiorenal patients and optimally treat it. This Masterclass looks at newer intravenous iron products, their benefits and role in this patient population.

Learning objectives

  • Iron deficiency anaemia – its prevalence in cardiorenal disease and why it matters
  • When is it appropriate to use iv iron – which patients and when
  • Overcoming challenges, including the complication of hypophosphataemia
  • The optimal use of iv iron prior to surgery

Is it for me?

This webinar is for healthcare professionals. It is aimed particularly at trainees treating cardiorenal patients particularly those working in nephrology, care of the elderly, general medicine, general practitioners, clinical pharmacists and allied disciplines. There will also be relevance for those working in cardiology.

Accreditation

The Cardiorenal Forum will issue certificates of attendance after the webinar, which will be equivalent to 2 CPD points.



Programme
  •   Chairpersons: Professor Paul Kalra, Consultant Cardiologist, Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust
    Dr Matthew Graham-Brown, Honorary Consultant Nephrologist, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust; NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer in Renal Medicine, University of Leicester
  •   18.00 Introduction
  •   18.05 IV iron therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease – how much is enough?
    Professor Philip Kalra, Consultant Nephrologist, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust; Professor of Renal Medicine, University of Manchester
    18.25 Discussion
  •   18.30 Hypophosphataemia with iv iron: clinical data and mechanistic insights
    Professor Myles Wolf, Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Nephrology, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University, North Carolina, USA
    18.50 Discussion
  •   18.55 Peri-operative optimisation – an update on IV iron treatment
    Dr Caroline Evans, Consultant Cardiothoracic Anaesthetist, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff
    19.20 Discussion
  •   19.25 Panel discussion with a nursing perspective followed by Q&A session
    Ms Sue Scott, Transfusion Nurse Practitioner, Haematology Department, Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Foundation Trust


   
Panel

Dr Caroline Evans Consultant in Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia, University of Wales, Cardiff

Caroline Evans is a Consultant Cardiothoracic Anaesthetist in Cardiff and Deputy Head of School for Anaesthesia Training in Wales. Caroline developed the first preoperative investigation and treatment pathway for anaemia in cardiac surgery in the UK and is the principle investigator for 2 Multicentre IV Iron clinical trials.

Dr Matthew Graham-Brown Honorary Consultant Nephrologist, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust; NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer in Renal Medicine, University of Leicester

Matthew Graham-Brown is an Honorary Consultant Nephrologist at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust. He is also an NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer in Renal Medicine at the University of Leicester. He has academic and clinical interests in cardiorenal disease and lifestyle interventions which aim to mitigate the processes which drive cardiovascular disease for patients with chronic kidney disease. He is the Chief Investigator on the ECSERT study (Kidney Research UK) which assesses the effects of a home-based exercise program on cardiometabolic disease and physical activity in kidney transplant patients and on the NIGHTLIFE-CMR study (British Heart Foundation), a nested multi-centre cardiac MRI sub-study of the NIGHTLIFE study (multi-centre NIHR HTA study) to assess the effects of extended hours nocturnal dialysis on cardiac structure and function. He is co-invetigator on the CONFIRM study which is validating non-contrast MRI sequences against histology in patients with end-stage kidney disease. He has also researched the use of social media to explore the needs of patients with chronic illness and manages patients with low-clearance CKD and kidney transplant patients as part of his clinical practice.

Professor Paul Kalra Consultant Cardiologist, Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust

Paul Kalra is a Consultant Cardiologist at Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust, and an Honorary Professor of Cardiology. His research interests include the role of iron deficiency and its correction in patients with heart failure, cardiorenal disease and the impact of hyperkalaemia on RAAS inhibition use. He is one of the founders of the Cardiorenal Forum and past Chair of the British Society for Heart Failure.

Professor Philip Kalra Consultant Nephrologist, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust; Professor of Renal Medicine, University of Manchester

Philip Kalra is Professor of Nephrology in Salford and the University of Manchester. He has been a Consultant Nephrologist since 1995, working at the Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust. He has major research focus on renovascular disease, cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD), CKD progression and iron use in CKD, and he leads the research team in Salford. He was Academic Vice President of the UK Renal Association from 2016–19, Chair of the UK Kidney Research Consortium during this time and was Chair of the NIHR CRN Renal Disorders group from 2010–18. He has been involved in the development of several large UK clinical trials in nephrology and cardiology, including the ASTRAL, PIVOTAL and IRONMAN trials, and he has played a role in amalgamating Cardiorenal education and research within the UK.

Ms Sue Scott Transfusion Nurse Practitioner, Haematology Department, Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Foundation Trust

Sue Scott was born in Edinburgh before moving to Bath to study for her nursing degree. She worked on an orthopaedics ward before moving into a Transfusion Practitioner role at the Royal United Hospital, Bath, where she has worked for the past 10 years. This role has changed and developed with the emphasis on blood conservation and surgical optimisation. Sue has also gained the qualifications and experience to become an independent prescriber. She has had a key role in introducing and establishing Surgical Optimisation in the Royal United Hospital, and she has presented on this topic at various conferences. The ability to both authorise blood products and prescribed drugs has allowed her to set up and run and nurse-led transfusion and optimisation clinic as part of the hospital’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Professor Myles Wolf Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Nephrology, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University, North Carolina, USA

Myles Wolf is Professor of Medicine, Chief of Nephrology, Professor of Population Health Sciences, and a Member of the Duke Clinical Research Institute at Duke University School of Medicine. The focus of his research is disordered mineral metabolism across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease, including dialysis, kidney transplantation and earlier stages. His primary contributions have been in the area of hormonal regulation of phosphate homeostasis. He has helped to characterise the physiological role of fibroblast growth factor 23 in health and in chronic kidney disease, and the impact of elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 levels on adverse clinical outcomes in patients with kidney disease.

 

Funding

Pharmacosmos has provided an educational grant to the Cardiorenal Forum (Secretariat, Concise Clinical Consulting) to support the costs of running this webinar and has had no influence over the content or selection of speakers for the programme.


Pharmacosmos