Intravenous iron

Free Cardiorenal Forum Masterclass Series
Tuesday 29th September 2020
18.00 – 19.30 BST (GMT +1)

Intravenous iron in cardiovascular patients


What is the webinar about?

Many patients with chronic and acute heart failure suffer from iron deficiency, which greatly affects their quality of life. It can reduce their exercise capacity and feeling of well-being.

Using oral iron products in heart failure is ineffective but newer intravenous iron products show good efficacy. They can improve six-minute walk test distance, peak oxygen consumption, New York Heart Association functional class and quality of life. It is also thought they help reduce hospitalisations for heart failure and cardiovascular mortality rates.

So it is important that we accurately diagnose iron deficiency in our heart failure patients and optimally treat it.

This webinar aims to update you with current thinking on iron deficiency in heart failure, its prevalence, clinical impact, current guidelines, treatment options and practical tips on service implementation. A practical demonstration will also be given on how to optimally infuse iv iron.

Learning objectives

  • the physiological role of iron in the body
  • iron deficiency, causes and investigations
  • how to interpret iron studies - ferritin to transferrin saturation (TSAT)
  • Iron deficiency in cardiovascular patients: how common is it and how is it associated with outcome?
  • intravenous iron - when to give it and potential patient benefits
  • practicalities of intravenous iron infusion
  • running an iv iron service - what you should know.

Is it for me?

This webinar can only be attended by healthcare professionals to whom it is offered free of charge. It is aimed particularly at trainees treating cardiorenal patients particularly those working in heart failure, cardiology, nephrology, care of the elderly, general medicine, general practitioners, clinical pharmacists and allied disciplines.

Funding

Pharmacosmos has provided an educational grant to the Cardiorenal Forum (Secretariat, Concise Clinical Consulting) to support the costs of running this webinar and has had no influence over the content or selection of speakers for the programme.


Pharmacosmos

Accreditation

The Cardiorenal Forum will issue certificates of attendance – equivalent to 1.5 CPD points (1.5 hours of learning) – after the webinar.


Programme
  •   Chairs: Professor Philip Kalra, Consultant Nephrologist, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust; Professor of Renal Medicine, University of Manchester
    Dr Chris Allen, BHF Clinical Research Fellow, St Thomas’ Hospital, London; President British Junior Cardiologists Association (BJCA)
  •   18.00 Introduction
  •   18.05 Iron metabolism and interpretation of iron studies
    Dr Paul WX Foley, Consultant Cardiologist, Great Western Hospitals NHS Trust, Swindon
  •   18.30 Iron deficiency and anaemia in cardiovascular disease: Does it matter and should we intervene?
    Professor Paul Kalra, Consultant Cardiologist, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
  •   18.55 Practicalities of giving IV iron
    Dr Caroline Evans, Consultant in Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia, University of Wales, Cardiff
    Ms Sue Scott, Transfusion Nurse Practitioner, Haematology Department, Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Foundation Trust
  •   19.15 Panel Discussion/Questions and Answers


   
Faculty

Dr Chris Allen BHF Clinical Research Fellow, St Thomas’ Hospital, London; President British Junior Cardiologists Association (BJCA)

Chris Allen is a BHF Clinical Research Fellow at St Thomas’ Hospital, London, and President of the British Junior Cardiologist’s Association. HIs areas of special interest are interventional cardiology and invasive assessment of cardiovascular physiology.

Dr Caroline Evans Consultant in Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia, University of Wales, Cardiff

Caroline Evans is a Consultant Cardiothoracic Anaesthetist in Cardiff and Deputy Head of School for Anaesthesia Training in Wales. Caroline developed the first preoperative investigation and treatment pathway for anaemia in cardiac surgery in the UK and is the principle investigator for 2 Multicentre IV Iron clinical trials.

Dr Paul WX Foley Consultant Cardiologist, Great Western Hospitals NHS Trust, Swindon

Paul WX Foley is a Consultant Cardiologist working at The Great Western Hospitals NHS Trust, Swindon. He has an interest in cardiovascular research, cardiac failure, device therapy and cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

Professor Paul Kalra Consultant Cardiologist, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust

Paul Kalra is a Consultant Cardiologist at Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, and an Honorary Professor of Cardiology. His research interests include the role of iron deficiency and its correction in patients with heart failure, cardiorenal disease and the impact of hyperkalaemia on RAAS inhibition use. He is one of the founders of the Cardiorenal Forum and past Chair of the British Society for Heart Failure.

Professor Philip Kalra Consultant Nephrologist, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust; Professor of Renal Medicine, University of Manchester

Philip Kalra graduated from Cambridge University and is Professor of Nephrology in Salford and the University of Manchester. He has been a Consultant Nephrologist since 1995, working at the Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust. He has major research focus on renovascular disease, cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD), CKD progression and iron use in CKD, and he leads the research team in Salford. He was Academic Vice President of the UK Renal Association from 2016–19, Chair of the UK Kidney Research Consortium during this time and was Chair of the NIHR CRN Renal Disorders group from 2010–18. He has been involved in the development of several large UK clinical trials in nephrology and cardiology, including the ASTRAL, PIVOTAL and IRONMAN trials, and he has played a role in amalgamating Cardiorenal education and research within the UK.

Ms Sue Scott Transfusion Nurse Practitioner, Haematology Department, Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Foundation Trust

Sue Scott was born in Edinburgh before moving to Bath to study for her nursing degree. She worked on an orthopaedics ward before moving into a Transfusion Practitioner role at the Royal United Hospital, Bath, where she has worked for the past 10 years. This role has changed and developed with the emphasis on blood conservation and surgical optimisation. Sue has also gained the qualifications and experience to become an independent prescriber. She has had a key role in introducing and establishing Surgical Optimisation in the Royal United Hospital, and she has presented on this topic at various conferences. The ability to both authorise blood products and prescribed drugs has allowed her to set up and run and nurse-led transfusion and optimisation clinic as part of the hospital’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.